Beauty & Truth Lab

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benjoyment:

48 Shades of Lightning 
Taken from last night’s thunderstorm.
(color hues are unretouched)

lilacsinthedooryard:

Wassily Kandinsky
Upward,1929

lilacsinthedooryard:

Wassily Kandinsky

Upward,1929

itscolossal:

Fantastic Fungi: The Startling Visual Diversity of Mushrooms Photographed by Steve Axford

(Source: awkwardsituationist)

(Source: yahoochrome)

Image: Polly Ngale - “Emu Seed,” http://tinyurl.com/q3nv75b

Image: Polly Ngale - “Emu Seed,” http://tinyurl.com/q3nv75b

Image: Barney DANIELS TJUNGURRAYI - “Bush Fire Dreaming,” http://tinyurl.com/m8sp56c

Image: Barney DANIELS TJUNGURRAYI - “Bush Fire Dreaming,” http://tinyurl.com/m8sp56c

Image: Grace Hartigan, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Hartigan

Image: Grace Hartigan, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Hartigan

To be the best pronoiac explorer you can be, I suggest you adopt an outlook that combines the rigorous objectivity of a scientist, the “beginner’s mind” of Zen Buddhism, the “beginner’s heart” of pronoia, and the compassionate friendliness of the Dalai Lama. 

Blend a scrupulously dispassionate curiosity with a skepticism driven by expansiveness, not spleen.

To pull this off, you’ll have to be willing to regularly suspend your brilliant theories about the way the world works. Accept with good humor the possibility that what you’ve learned in the past may not be a reliable guide to understanding the fresh phenomenon that’s right in front of you. 

Be suspicious of your biases, even the rational and benevolent ones. Open your heart as you strip away the interpretations that your emotions might be inclined to impose.

"Before we can receive the unbiased truth about anything," wrote my teacher Ann Davies, "we have to be ready to ignore what we would like to be true."

At the same time, don’t turn into a hard-ass, poker-faced robot. Keep your feelings moist and receptive. Remember your natural affection for all of creation. Enjoy the power of tender sympathy as it drives you to probe for the unimaginable revelations of every new moment. 

"Before we can receive the entire truth about anything," said Ann Davies, "we have to love it."

http://bit.ly/Pronoia

Here are your horoscopes for the week, featuring inside information from the source where the obvious secrets are kept: http://bit.ly/1o3grYY

Image: Susie Bootja Bootja Napaltjarri, http://tinyurl.com/luvfa5q

Image: Susie Bootja Bootja Napaltjarri, http://tinyurl.com/luvfa5q

(Source: andthewallswereveryhigh)

Image: Nora Wompi Nungurrayi, http://tinyurl.com/kkpdujb.

Image: Nora Wompi Nungurrayi, http://tinyurl.com/kkpdujb

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"That which can be destroyed by the truth should be," wrote author P. C. Hodgell. I wish there were a gentler way to articulate that wisdom, but I can’t think of one. 

Instead I’ll suggest a way to apply it so as to make the end result more graceful than shocking: Don’t pour out the whole truth all at once in one big dramatic gesture. Do it gradually and tenderly. 

As you do, keep in mind that when the truth has finally dismantled the thing that could not endure the truth, you may be able to use the debris as raw material to build something new that the truth will feel right at home in.

To achieve what the Zen Buddhists call “beginner’s mind,” you dispense with all preconceptions and enter each situation as if seeing it for the first time.

"In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities," wrote Shunryu Suzuki in his book "Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind," "but in the expert’s there are few."

As much as I love beginner’s mind, though, I advocate an additional discipline: cultivating a beginner’s heart. That means approaching every encounter imbued with a freshly invoked wave of love that is as pure as if you’re feeling it for the first time.

- http://bit.ly/Pronoia

BBC reported on the growing number of “spiritual tourists” who shop around in their search for inner peace. “We are entering a world,” said one expert, “where people aren’t interested in whether something is true or not, or whether they believe it or not, but whether it works.”

EXPERIMENT: For a given period, say, six months or ten years, reject any idea or theory unless it has the practical value of making you feel more at peace and more generous toward others and more devoted to caring for the earth.